2015-2016 Science Planning Summaries
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2015-2016 USAP Field Season
Project Detail

Project Title

Palmer, Antarctica Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER): Land-shelf-ocean connectivity, ecosystem resilience and transformation in a sea-ice influenced pelagic ecosystem


no photo available

Summary

Event Number:
C-021-L
NSF/OPP Award 1440435

Program Manager:
Dr. Jennifer Burns

ASC POC/Implementer:
Samina Ouda / Adam Jenkins


Principal Investigator

Dr. Doug Martinson
dgm@ldeo.columbia.edu

Columbia University
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Palisades, New York

Project Web Site:
http://pal.lternet.edu External Web Site


Location

Supporting Stations: ARSV Laurence M. Gould
Research Locations: Palmer study site / Palmer Station


Description

Palmer Long-Term Ecological Research (PAL-LTER) started in 1990 to address the hypothesis that the annual sea ice cycle may be the major determinant of spatial/temporal changes in the structure and function of Antarctic marine communities. Research now includes bacteria, viruses, phytoplankton, krill, macrozooplankton, penguins, seabirds, and marine mammals. The PAL-LTER model traces the effects of changing climate, and the extent, duration, and seasonality of sea ice on ecosystem composition and dynamics in the Western Antarctic Peninsula, where satellite observations over the past 35 years indicate the average duration of sea ice cover is now about 90 days shorter. Six collaborative projects deploy on January’s ARSV Laurence M. Gould cruise and/or to Palmer Station. Team members use airborne and underwater vehicles, moorings, numerical modeling, oceanographic cruises, and environmental sampling to address core hypotheses.


Field Season Overview

Shiptime: We will conduct our summer cruise aboard LMG between ca. Jan 1 - Feb 15. The actual dates must allow for 30 science days (PAL?PAL) on the cruise proper, and a two-day loading and setup period at Palmer Station prior to the cruise. The date range (plus/minus a few days) is also critical. In order to minimize confusing seasonal with interannual variability, we need to keep the actual observation period uniform from year to year. Operations: Standard hydrographic, net, trawl, MOCNESS, acoustic sampling gear, full access to the bridge for seabird and marine mammal surveys and other related shipboard support are required as in past LTER cruises aboard LMG, both during the survey of the LTER Grid and during extended (3-5 day) process studies. At the process study stations we will conduct repeated sampling with the CTD-Rosette, nets and gliders and perform intensive deckboard and lab experiments. Two sediment trap moorings will be recovered and redeployed at the LTER site near Hugo Island. Four physical oceanographic moorings will recovered and redeployed. We will conduct sampling for the Thorium-234 deficit in the upper water column, and process samples on board the vessel. We will conduct 1 to 5 day field camps on Avian and Charcot Islands. Zodiac support is required for deploying to these field sites, as time and ice conditions permit. Zodiac support will be required for glider operations and to deploy satellite tags on baleen whales and to collect biopsy samples and individual photo ID data. Two fully?equipped radioisotope vans are required (one for C14 and one for 3H). Thorium-234 work must to be accommodated in the main lab spaces. Marine technician support is required to deploy hydrographic sampling instrumentation, Zodiacs, gliders and moorings. We require 20 science berths on the cruise. An education and outreach component requires transfer of images and other files, up to 25 MB daily from ship and shore. Standard hydrographic, net, trawl, MOCNESS, acoustic sampling gear, full access to the bridge for seabird and marine mammal surveys and other related shipboard support are required as in past LTER cruises aboard LMG, both during the survey of the LTER Grid and during extended (3-5 day) process studies. At the process study stations we will conduct repeated sampling with the CTD-Rosette, nets and gliders and perform intensive deckboard and lab experiments. Two sediment trap moorings will be recovered and redeployed at the LTER site near Hugo Island. Four physical oceanographic moorings will recovered and redeployed. We will conduct sampling for the Thorium 234 deficit in the upper water column, and process samples on board the vessel. We will conduct 1 to 5 day field camps on Avian and Charcot Islands. Zodiac support is required for deploying to these field sites, as time and ice conditions permit. Zodiac support will be required for glider operations and to deploy satellite tags on baleen whales and to collect biopsy samples, and individual photo ID data. Two fully?equipped radioisotope vans are required (one for C14 and one for 3H). We will collect several small soil samples during visits to Rothera and Charcot Island, in accord with ACA, Treaty and BAS regulations. Thorium 234 work needs to be accommodated in the main lab spaces. Marine technician support is required to deploy hydrographic sampling instrumentation, Zodiacs, gliders and moorings. We require 20 science berths on the cruise. The two additional science berths are allocated to Dr. Sherrell (funded separately). An education and outreach component requires transfer of images and other files, up to 10 MB daily from ship and shore.